Indigenous Film Index: Oceania



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culture groups


'Are'are


ꞌAreꞌare is the name of a people from the south of the island of Malaita, which is part of the Solomon Islands. Their language is the ꞌAreꞌare language, which is part of the Austronesian language family. In 1999 there were an estimated 17,800 speakers.

Prior to colonisation and subsequent independence, the ꞌAreꞌare occupied a much larger geographical area encompassing parts of Guadalcanal and Makira, as well as Malaita. This included the northern part of Makira known as Arosi and the eastern part of Guadalcanal known today as Marau Sound. In the past they lived in hamlets in the mountainous hinterland, or on the banks of lagoons in the southwest or the Mara Masika Strait (separating Malaita and South Malaita islands), but during colonization many coastal villages were established.

Source:
Wikipedia

Learn more:
‘Are’Are language – Wikipedia
Study Guide: ‘Are’are Music and Shaping Bamboo – DER

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Pintupi


The Pintupi are an Australian Aboriginal group who are part of the Western Desert cultural group and whose traditional land is in the area west of Lake Macdonald and Lake Mackay in Western Australia. These people moved (or were moved) into the Aboriginal communities of Papunya and Haasts Bluff in the west of the Northern Territory in the 1940s–1980s. The last Pintupi to leave their traditional lifestyle in the desert, in 1984, are a group known as the Pintupi Nine, also sometimes called the “lost tribe”.

Source:
Wikipedia

Learn more:
Pintupi Nine – Wikipedia
Pintupi – Goldfields Aboriginal Language Centre

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Satawalese


The Satawalese primarily subsist on fishing and some agriculture (coconuts, breadfruit, taro). They build small thatch houses for sleeping and use the trunks of breadfruit trees for boat-building. Cultural forms primarily revolve around dance and story-telling, and an alcoholic beverage known as tuba (a palm wine) is brewed from fermented coconut milk.

Source:
Wikipedia

Learn more:
Traditional Micronesian Navigation Collection 
Indigenous Navigation in the Pacific – canoeisthepeople.org

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Tongans


The Tongan archipelago has been inhabited for perhaps 3000 years, since settlement in late Lapita times. The Tongan culture has surely changed greatly over this long time period. Before the arrival of European explorers in the late 17th and early 18th centuries, the Tongans were in frequent contact with their nearest Oceanic neighbors, Fiji and Samoa. In the 19th century, with the arrival of Western traders and missionaries, Tongan culture changed dramatically. Some old beliefs and habits were thrown away and others adopted. Some accommodations made in the 19th century and early 20th century are now being challenged by changing Western civilization. Hence Tongan culture is far from a unified or monolithic affair, and Tongans themselves may differ strongly as to what it is “Tongan” to do, or not do.

Source:
Wikipedia

Learn more:
Tongan Culture – Culture Atlas
Tongan Culture – Polynesian Cultural Center

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Turaga


The Turaga nation (from tu “stand” and raga, a tribal name) is an Indigenous movement based in northern Pentecost Island, Vanuatu. Its leader is Chief Viraleo Boborenvanua, and it has also been associated with Motarilavoa Hilda Lin̄i. The organisation has its headquarters in the traditional village of Lavatmanggemu on the north-east coast of Pentecost.

The Turaga movement promotes the revival of traditional Melanesian customs, modernised in certain respects. In place of the Western economic system, which is seen as a cause of poverty and foreign dependency, the movement promotes the kastom (custom) economy, based on traditional systems of economic exchange and native forms of currency such as pigs and woven mats. The Turaga movement operates its own bank (called Tangbunia after the giant baskets in which valuables were traditionally stored) at which these items can be deposited, and has devised a unit of currency (the livatu, equal to the value of a fully curved boar’s tusk) in which their value can be reckoned. Turaga has also announced controversial plans to print its own paper currency.

Source:
WIkipedia

Learn more:
The Chief fighting for an Indigenous Vanatu nation – Al Jazeera

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Tuvaluan


The Tuvaluans are Polynesian, and their language, Tuvaluan, is closely related to Samoan. Nui, however, was heavily settled in prehistoric times by Micronesians from the Gilbert Islands (now Kiribati). English is taught in the schools and widely used. The vast majority of the population belongs to the Church of Tuvalu (the former Ellice Islands Protestant Church).

Source:
Brittanica

Learn more:
“One day we’ll disappear”: Tuvalu’s Shrinking Islands – The Guardian
Culture of Tuvalu – everyculture.com

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Wangatjungka


Wangkatjungka is a large community situated 100km south-east of Fitzroy Crossing. Jimmy Bieundurry was one of the key elders who established Wangkatjunka Community. The community is located on an excision of Christmas Creek Station and is a settlement of predominately Wangkatjungka speaking people. There are about 180 permanent residents and the people are Wangkatjungka, Walmajarri or Gooniyandi with strong links to their desert culture. There is a store, Centrelink agent, health clinic, Home and Community Care, play group, school, administration office including community hall and kitchen, football ground and basketball court. The landscape is hot and dry in summer. However there are gorges, waterholes and caves close by. Hunting, gathering bush products, hosting people from other communities, travelling on culture and lore business and participating in ceremonies are cultural activities of significance to the people of the community.

Source:
www.kurungalcouncil.org.au

Learn more:
Wangatjungka Art & Painting – Japinka Aboriginal Art
Wangatjungka – mww.org.au

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Yolngu (Wulamba)


The Yolngu (Wulamba) are an aggregation of Aboriginal Australian people inhabiting north-eastern Arnhem Land in the Northern Territory of Australia. Yolngu means “person” in the Yolŋu languages.

All Yolngu clans are affiliated with either the Dhuwa (also spelt Dua) or the Yirritja moiety. Prominent Dhuwa clans include the Rirratjiŋu and Gälpu clans of the Dangu people, while the Gumatj clan is the most prominent in the Yirritja moiety.

Source:
Wikipedia

Learn more:
The Yolngu – National Museum of Australia
Yolgngu Culture- Dhimurru Aboriginal Corporation

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FILMS